Join the Right Question Network

Our strategies and resources are the outcomes of decades of work. We continue to learn with practitioners across many fields to develop and simplify two robust processes,

  • The Question Formulation Technique, which helps all individuals learn how to formulate, work with, and use their own questions. Through learning how to ask their own questions everyone, students, parents, clients, and patients alike, can become more engaged, critical thinkers.
  • The Framework for Accountable Decision Making, which helps individuals, learn for themselves how to effectively participate in decisions that affect them. Through learning how to effectively participate in decision, the decision-making process becomes more democratic and all individuals are equipped with skills to advocate for themselves.

Join the Right Question Network Today

Already a Member? Log in.

The free resources you will find on our network will help you easily move into action to learn a strategy one day and facilitate the very next.

As a member of our website, you can:

  • Access free downloadable resources to learn the Question Formulation Technique to teach others how to formulate their own questions
  • Access free downloadable resources to learn the Framework for Accountable Decision Making to teach others how to more effectively participate in the decision-making process
  • Watch videos to learn how to effectively implement these strategies and learn from practitioners across different fields
  • Peruse blogs and dig into the nuance of facilitation and continue to learn how to best adapt implementation for different purposes
  • Learn about recent news and upcoming events
  • Receive regular newsletters including information on new resources, blogs, articles, and learning opportunities

I think the idea that you can question the authority (and that you have a right to do so if you don’t understand something) is what I took away from your session.

Asking questions is a step in creating change.

I think it helps us build higher level questions. When we go over our questions and try to make them better, it helps us think. The questions help us dig deeper and go beyond basic facts and we develop questions that give us more than yes or no answers.

As the title of this book indicates, Dan Rothstein and Luz Santana believe that education can be transformed if students, rather than teachers, assume responsibility for posing questions. This idea may sound simple, but it is both complex and radical: complex, in that formulating good, generative questions, and being prepared to work toward satisfactory answers, is hardly a simple undertaking; and radical, in the sense that an apparently easy move can bring about a Copernican revolution in the atmosphere of the classroom and the dynamics of learning. The authors modestly quote physicist Niels Bohr who once said, ‘An expert is someone who has made all possible mistakes in a field and there are no more to be made.’ In reading this powerful work, I was reminded of what Albert Einstein said, when he learned of Jean Piaget’s pioneering questioning of young children: ‘so simple only a genius could have thought of it.’

I do think that the QFT process did open up students to be inquisitive, reflective thinkers, and these characteristics permeated into how students approached learning in any content area or aspect of school.

Join the Right Question Network Today

Already a Member? Log in.

Sign up for the RQI Network to access these resources.

The hundreds of free resources you will find on our network will help you easily move into action to learn a strategy one day and facilitate the very next.

Already a Member? Log in.

Please join to view member profiles.

You’ll also get access to hundreds of free resources that will help you easily move into action to learn a strategy one day and facilitate the very next.

Already a Member? Log in.